Editorial: Donald Trump’s Impeachment

Editorials by members of the Peddie News editorial staff reflect the ideas and opinions of those editors and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Peddie News or Peddie School.

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Editorial: Donald Trump’s Impeachment

Rachel Thomas, Junior Co-Editor-in-Chief

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President Donald Trump’s chaotic term is coming to an end, but will he get kicked out first? It is safe to say that over his four years as President of the United States, Trump has been faced with multiple allegations, mainly by members of the Democratic party, from evading taxes to sexual harassment. Yet every time, Trump manages to save his skin and continue his job without a penalty.

But not this time.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced a formal inquiry into America’s forty-fifth president on September 24, 2019, and thus, the impeachment process began.

The process of impeaching a president in America is quite long and tedious. It begins with charges being brought up against the President by the only part of government that has the power to impeach: the House of Representatives. An article must then be written for each alleged offense and approved by the House. Only once a vote is taken by the House is the president officially impeached. If passed, the trial moves to the Senate, where it has to pass by a two-thirds vote for the President to officially be removed from office. 

So far in the history of the United States, only two presidents have experienced impeachment: Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton. Both presidents were impeached by the House of Representatives; however they were acquitted by the Senate and completed their terms in office. 

As the third president in US history, Trump was officially impeached by the House on December 18, 2019. Due to alleged misuse of his political position to strengthen his personal chances in the 2020 election, Trump was charged with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Pelosi and the House members delivered the articles of impeachment to the Senate earlier this week.

Yet, despite how close the Democrats have come to taking Trump out, the chances of the Republican-dominated Senate passing a Republican president’s impeachment are quite slim. Chances are, history will repeat itself and Trump will get acquitted and stay in the oval office like Johnson and Clinton. Once again, Trump will get off scot-free and make the Democrats look bad in the process. 

With all the dirt politicians face, Trump has had the most against him, yet was the least affected. He was able to evade accusations of sixteen sexual assault cases, mafia ties and even racial discrimination in the 1970s when he and his father, under the Trump management, refused to rent apartments to people based on their skin color. On top of all of this, Trump used the highly respected and honored position of President of the United States to pressure the president of Ukraine to give him damaging information on his political opponent Joe Biden. He used foreign aid to improve his own personal chance in the 2020 election. To me, this should be more than enough cause for removal from office. 

Unfortunately chances are that Trump will keep the impeachment title but get to keep his seat in the White House as well. However, for now, the rest of the process is in the Senate’s hands and until they vote, nothing can be said for sure.